Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC)

Dr David Hegarty

The Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC) is a 24-item measure of children’s self-regulation. The ERC can be answered by adults well acquainted with the child, such as the father, mother, caregiver, or teacher. It was designed to assess the child’s ability to manage and to cope with emotions.

Developer

Shields, A., & Cicchetti, D. (1997). Emotion regulation among school-age children: The development and validation of a new criterion Q-sort scale. Developmental Psychology, 33(6), 906–916. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.33.6.906

 

References

Denham, S. A., Bassett, H. H., Mincic, M., Kalb, S., Way, E., Wyatt, T., & Segal, Y. (2012). Socialemotional learning profi les of preschoolers’ early school success: A person-centered approach. Learning and Individual Differences, 22(2), 178-189. doi:10.1016/j.lindif.2011.05.001

Eisenberg, N. (2001). The core and correlates of affective social competence. Social Development, 10, 120-124. doi:10.1111/1467-9507.00151

Izard, C. E., King, K. A., Trentacosta, C. J., Morgan, J. K., Laurenceau, J.-P., Krauthamer-Ewing, E. S., & Finlon, K. J. (2008). Accelerating the development of emotion competence in Head Start children: Effects on adaptive and maladaptive behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 20(1), 369-397. doi:10.1017/ S0954579408000175

Lopes, P. N., Salovey, P., Côté, S., & Beers, M. (2005). Emotion regulation abilities and the quality of social interaction. Emotion, 5(1), 113- 118. doi:10.1037/1528-3542.5.1.113

Morgan, J. K., Izard, C. E., & King, K. A. (2010). Construct validity of the Emotion Matching Task: Preliminary evidence for convergent and criterion validity of a new emotion knowledge measure for young children. Social Development, 19(1), 52– 70. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00529.x

Henriques Reis, A., Silva de Oliveira, S. E., Ruschel Bandeira, D., Côrtes Andrade, N., Abreu, N., & Sperb, T. M. (2016). Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC): Estudos Preliminares da Adaptação e Validação para a Cultura Brasileira. Temas em Psicologia, 24(1), 77-96.

Shields, A., Dickstein, S., Seifer, R., Giusti, L., Magee, K. D., & Spritz, B. (2001). Emotional competence and early school adjustment: A study of preschoolers at risk. Early Education and Development, 12(1), 73-96. doi:10.1207/ s15566935eed1201_5

Shields, A., Ryan, R. M., & Cicchetti, D. (2001). Narrative representations of caregivers and emotion dysregulation as predictors of maltreated children’s rejection by peers. Developmental Psychology, 37(3), 321-337. doi:10.1037/0012- 1649.37.3.321

Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ)

Dr David Hegarty

The Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) is a brief, 10-item, self-report measure of substance dependence intended to capture the essential elements of the dependence syndrome across all substance classes. The LDQ can provide clinicians and researchers with a unitary, continuous, measure of dependence that is not specific to any particular substance (Edwards & Gross, 1976; Edwards, 1986).

Developer

Raistrick, D., Bradshaw, J., Tober, G., Weiner, J., Allison, J., & Healey, C. (1994). Development of the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ): a questionnaire to measure alcohol and opiate dependence in the context of a treatment evaluation package. Addiction , 89(5), 563–572. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.1994.tb03332.x

 

References

Edwards G. (1986). The alcohol dependence syndrome: a concept as stimulus to enquiry. British journal of addiction, 81(2), 171–183. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.1986.tb00313.x

Edwards, G., & Gross, M. M. (1976). Alcohol dependence: provisional description of a clinical syndrome. British medical journal, 1(6017), 1058–1061. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6017.1058

Heather, N., Raistrick, D., Tober, G., Godfrey, C., & Parrott, S. (2001). Leeds Dependence Questionnaire: New Data from a Large Sample of Clinic Attenders. Addiction Research & Theory, 9(3), 253–269. https://doi.org/10.3109/16066350109141753

Kelly, J. F., Magill, M., Slaymaker, V., & Kahler, C. (2010). Psychometric validation of the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) in a young adult clinical sample. Addictive Behaviors, 35(4), 331–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.11.005

Paton-Simpson, G., & MacKinnon, S. (1999). Evaluation of the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) for New Zealand. Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand. https://www.hpa.org.nz/sites/default/files/imported/field_research_publication_file/Leeds.pdf

Raistrick, D., Tober, G., Sweetman, J., Unsworth, S., Crosby, H., & Evans, T. (2014). Measuring clinically significant outcomes – LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction. Psychiatric Bulletin (2014), 38(3), 112–115. https://doi.org/10.1192/pb.bp.112.041301

Tober, G., Brearley, R., Kenyon, R., Raistrick, D., & Morley, S. (2000). Measuring Outcomes in a Health Service Addiction Clinic. Addiction Research & Theory, 8(2), 169–182. https://doi.org/10.3109/16066350009004418

Institute for Basic Research – Modified Overt Aggression Scale (IBR-MOAS)

Dr David Hegarty

The Institute for Basic Research – Modified Overt Aggression Scale (IBR-MOAS) is a 20-item assessment of the type, frequency, and severity of aggressive behaviours within autistic, traumatic brain injury, and intellectually disabled populations that is completed by a caregiver (Cohen et al., 2010). The IBR-MOAS can be used to measure the efficacy of therapy on aggressive behaviours in both clinical and community settings.

Developer

Cohen, I.L., Tsiouris, J.A., Flory, M.J. et al. (2010). A Large Scale Study of the Psychometric Characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale: Findings and Evidence for Increased Self-Destructive Behaviors in Adult Females with Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Autism Dev Disord 40, 599–609. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-009-0908-z

 

References

Yudofsky, S. C., Silver, J. M., Jackson, W., Endicott, J., & Williams, D. (1986). The Overt Aggression Scale for the objective rating of verbal and physical aggression. American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 35–39.

Kessler Psychological Distress Scale-5 (K5)

Dr David Hegarty

The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale-5 (K5) is a 5-item self-report questionnaire designed to assess psychological distress over the past four weeks. The K5 is a shortened version of the K10, and involved wording modifications for certain items to ensure cultural appropriateness and understanding for Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Island populations. It is designed for Australian indigenous adults aged 16 years and over.

Developer

Kessler, R., & Mroczek, D. (1992). An update of the development of mental health screening scales for the US national health interview study. Ann Arbor, MI: Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.


Australian Government Department of Health. (2018). Primary Mental Health Care Minimum Data Set: Scoring the Kessler-5. Australian Government Department of Health: Canberra, Australia.

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2009). Measuring the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (Catalogue No.: IHW 24). Canberra, Australia: AIHW.

Brinckley, M. M., Calabria, B., Walker, J., Thurber, K. A., & Lovett, R. (2021). Reliability, validity, and clinical utility of a culturally modified Kessler scale (MK-K5) in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. BMC Public Health, 21(1), 1111. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11138-4

Burgess, C. P., Johnston, F. H., Berry, H. L., McDonnell, J., Yibarbuk, D., Gunabarra, C., Mileran, A., & Bailie, R. S. (2009). Healthy country, healthy people: the relationship between Indigenous health status and “caring for country”. The Medical Journal of Australia, 190(10), 567–572. https://doi.org/10.5694/j.1326-5377.2009.tb02566.x

Cunningham, J., & Paradies, Y. C. (2012). Socio-demographic factors and psychological distress in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adults aged 18-64 years: analysis of national survey data. BMC Public Health, 12, 95. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-95

Kessler, R., & Mroczek, D. (1992). An update of the development of mental health screening scales for the US national health interview study. Ann Arbor, MI: Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

Kelaher, M. A., Ferdinand, A. S., & Paradies, Y. (2014). Experiencing racism in health care: the mental health impacts for Victorian Aboriginal communities. The Medical Journal of Australia, 201(1), 44–47. https://doi.org/10.5694/mja13.10503

LaGrappe, D., Massey, L., Kruavit, A., Howarth, T., Lalara, G., Daniels, B., Wunungmurra, J. G., Flavell, K., Barker, R., Flavell, H., & Heraganahally, S. S. (2022). Sleep disorders among Aboriginal Australians with Machado-Joseph Disease: Quantitative results from a multiple methods study to assess the experience of people living with the disease and their caregivers. Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms, 12, 100075. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nbscr.2022.100075

Martin, K. E., & Wood, L. J. (2017). Drumming to a new beat: A group therapeutic drumming and talking intervention to improve mental health and behaviour of disadvantaged adolescent boys. Children Australia, 42(4), 268–276. https://doi.org/10.1017/cha.2017.40

McNamara, B. J., Banks, E., Gubhaju, L., Williamson, A., Joshy, G., Raphael, B., & Eades, S. J. (2014). Measuring psychological distress in older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Australians: a comparison of the K-10 and K-5. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38(6), 567–573. https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12271

Redman-MacLaren, M. L., Klieve, H., McCalman, J., Russo, S., Rutherford, K., Wenitong, M., & Bainbridge, R. G. (2017). Measuring resilience and risk factors for the psychosocial well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander boarding school students: Pilot baseline study results. Frontiers in Education, 2, 5. https://doi.org/10.3389/feduc.2017.00005

Stolk, Y., Kaplan, I., & Szwarc, J. (2014). Clinical use of the Kessler psychological distress scales with culturally diverse groups. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 23(2), 161–183. https://doi.org/10.1002/mpr.1426

Empathy Quotient (EQ-40)

Dr David Hegarty

The Empathy Quotient – 40 item version (EQ-40) is a self-report tool to assess empathy in adults (18 years of age and older). The EQ-40 (Baron-Cohen & Wheelwright, 2004) assesses various aspects of empathy and three subscales are included:

  • Cognitive Empathy (understand others’ thoughts, feelings and perspectives)
  • Emotional Empathy (attunement to others’ emotions)
  • Social Skills (interacting effectively with others).

Developer

Baron-Cohen, S., & Wheelwright, S. (2004). The Empathy Quotient: An Investigation of Adults with Asperger Syndrome or High Functioning Autism, and Normal Sex Differences. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34(2), 163–175.

References

Allison, C., Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S. J., Stone, M. H., & Muncer, S. J. (2011). Psychometric analysis of the Empathy Quotient (EQ). Personality and Individual Differences, 51(7), 829–835. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2011.07.005

Bons, D., van den Broek, E., Scheepers, F., Herpers, P., Rommelse, N., & Buitelaaar, J. K. (2013). Motor, emotional, and cognitive empathy in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and conduct disorder. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 41, 425-443. Doi: 10.1007/s10802-012-9689-5

Decety, J., & Ickes, W. (Eds.). (2009). The social neuroscience of empathy. MIT Press.

de Lima, F. F., & Osório, F. de L. (2021). Empathy: Assessment Instruments and Psychometric Quality – A Systematic Literature Review With a Meta-Analysis of the Past Ten Years. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 781346–781346. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.781346

Dinsdale, N., & Crespi, B. J. (2013). The Borderline Empathy Paradox: Evidence And Conceptual Models For Empathic Enhancements In Borderline Personality Disorder. Journal Of Personality Disorders, 27(2), 172–195. https://Doi.Org/10.1521/Pedi_2012_26_071

Eklund, J. H., & Meranius, M. S. (2021). Toward a consensus on the nature of empathy: A review of reviews. Patient Education and Counseling104(2), 300–307. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2020.08.022

Groen, Y., Fuermaier, A. B. M., Den Heijer, A. E., Tucha, O., & Althaus, M. (2015). The Empathy and Systemising Quotient: The Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version and a Review of the Cross-Cultural Stability. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(9), 2848–2864. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2448-z

Lawrence, E. J., Shaw, P., Baker, D., Baron-Cohen, S., & David, A. S. (2004). Measuring empathy: reliability and validity of the Empathy Quotient. Psychological Medicine, 34(5), 911–920. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291703001624

Michaels, T. M., Horan, W. P., Ginger, E. J., Martinovich, Z., Pinkham, A. E., & Smith, M. J. (2014). Cognitive empathy contributes to poor social functioning in schizophrenia: Evidence from a new self-report measure of cognitive and affective empathy. Psychiatry Research, 220(3), 803–810. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.08.054

Muncer, S. J., & Ling, J. (2006). Psychometric analysis of the empathy quotient (EQ) scale. Personality and Individual Differences, 40(6), 1111–1119. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2005.09.020

Pepper, K. L., Demetriou, E. A., Park, S. H., Boulton, K. A., Hickie, I. B., Thomas, E. E., & Guastella, A. J. (2019). Self-reported empathy in adults with autism, early psychosis, and social anxiety disorder. Psychiatry Research, 281, 112604–112604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112604

Rum, Y., & Perry, A. (2020). Empathic Accuracy in Clinical Populations. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11, 457–457. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00457
 

Schwenck, C., Mergenthaler, J., Keller, K., Zech, J., Salehi, S., Taurines, R., Romanos, M., Schecklmann, M., Schneider, W., Warnke, A., & Freitag, C. M. (2012). Empathy in children with autism and conduct disorder: group-specific profiles and developmental aspects. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 53(6), 651–659. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2011.02499.x

Tone, E. B., & Tully, E. C. (2014). Empathy as a “risky strength”: A multilevel examination of empathy and risk for internalising disorders. Development and Psychopathology, 26(4pt2), 1547–1565. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414001199

Turner, I. N., Foster, J. D., & Webster, G. D. (2019). The Dark Triad’s inverse relations with cognitive and emotional empathy: High-powered tests with multiple measures. Personality and Individual Differences, 139, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2018.10.030
 

Velotti, P., Garofalo, C., Dimaggio, G., & Fonagy, P. (2019). Mindfulness, Alexithymia, and Empathy Moderate Relations Between Trait Aggression and Antisocial Personality Disorder Traits. Mindfulness, 10(6), 1082–1090. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-018-1048-3

Wakabayashi, A., Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S., Goldenfeld, N., Delaney, J., Fine, D., Smith, R., & Weil, L. (2006). Development of short forms of the Empathy Quotient (EQ-Short) and the Systemising Quotient (SQ-Short). Personality and Individual Differences, 41(5), 929–940. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2006.03.017

Wheelwright, S., Baron-Cohen, S., Goldenfeld, N., Delaney, J., Fine, D., Smith, R., Weil, L., & Wakabayashi, A. (2006). Predicting autism spectrum quotient (AQ) from the systemizing quotient-revised (SQ-R) and empathy quotient (EQ): Multiple perspectives on the Psychological and neural bases of social cognition. Brain Research, 1079, 47–56. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2006.01.012

World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule – Children and Youth version (WHODAS-Child)

Dr David Hegarty

The World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule – Children and Youth (WHODAS-Child; Scorza et al., 2013) is a practical, generic assessment instrument that can measure health and disability in children and youth (aged 10 – 17 years of age). The WHODAS-Child has been adapted for children and youth from the adult version of the WHODAS-2. There are two ways to use the WHODAS-Child:

  1. Parents can utilise this version of the WHODAS-Child to report their child’s difficulties, OR
  2. Youths aged 11 years or older can complete it independently for self-reporting purposes

Developer

Scorza, P., Stevenson, A., Canino, G., Mushashi, C., Kanyanganzi, F., Munyanah, M., & Betancourt, T. (2013). Validation of the “World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule for children, WHODAS-Child” in Rwanda. PloS One, 8(3), e57725–e57725. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0057725  

References

American Psychiatric Association. Online Assessment Measures. (n.d.). Retrieved November 6, 2021, from https://www.psychiatry.org/File%20Library/Psychiatrists/Practice/DSM/APA_DSM5_WHODAS-2-Self-Administered.pdf  

Kessler Psychological Distress Scale PLUS (K10+)

Dr David Hegarty

The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale Plus (K10+) is a 14-question psychological screening tool designed to identify adults with significant levels of psychological distress, and has the same first 10 questions as the K10, with the addition of four questions asking about the impact of the distress on daily living.

Developer

Kessler, R.C., Andrews, G., Colpe, .et al (2002) Short screening scales to monitor population prevalences and trends in non-specific psychological distress. Psychological Medicine, 32, 959-956

References

Andrews, G., & Slade, T. (2001). Interpreting scores on the Kessler psychological distress scale (K10). Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 25(6), 494-497.

Brooks, R. T., Beard, J., & Steel, Z. (2006). Factor structure and interpretation of the K10. Psychological assessment, 18(1), 62.

Slade, T., Grove, R., & Burgess, P. (2011). Kessler psychological distress scale: normative data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 45(4), 308-316.

Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI)

Dr David Hegarty

The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) is a brief, 9-item, self-report measure of problematic gambling behaviours in the general population (Ferris & Wynne, 2001). The PGSI is able to identify different subgroups of problem gamblers with different levels of risk status (none, low, moderate, and problematic).

 

Developer

Ferris, J., & Wynne, H. (2001). The Canadian Problem Gambling Index (Final report). Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. https://www.greo.ca/Modules/EvidenceCentre/files/Ferris%20et%20al(2001)The_Canadian_Problem_Gambling_Index.pdf

References

Currie, S. R., Casey, D. M., & Hodgins, D. C. (2010). Improving the psychometric properties of the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Ottawa: Canadian Consortium for Gambling Research.

Currie, S. R., Hodgins, D. C., & Casey, D. M. (2013). Validity of the problem gambling severity index interpretive categories. Journal of gambling studies, 29, 311-327. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-012-9300-6

Holtgraves, T. (2009). Evaluating the problem gambling severity index. Journal of gambling studies, 25, 105-120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-008-9107-7

Miller, N. V., Currie, S. R., Hodgins, D. C., & Casey, D. (2013). Validation of the problem gambling severity index using confirmatory factor analysis and rasch modelling. International journal of methods in psychiatric research, 22(3), 245–255. https://doi.org/10.1002/mpr.1392

Sharp, C., Steinberg, L., Yaroslavsky, I., Hofmeyr, A., Dellis, A., Ross, D., & Kincaid, H. (2012). An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Assessment, 19(2), 167-175. https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191111418296

Life Skills Profile (LSP-16)

Dr David Hegarty

The abbreviated Life Skills Profile (LSP-16; Rosen et al., 1989) is a clinician-rated assessment that contains 16 items which provide a key measure of function and disability for people with mental illness. The focus of LSP-16 is on the person’s general functioning, i.e. how the person functions in terms of their social relationships and ability to do day-to-day tasks. 

 

Developer

Rosen, A., Hadzi-Pavlovic, & D., Parker, G. (1989). The Life Skills Profile: A measure assessing function and disability in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin. 15(2): 325-337. https://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1093/schbul/15.2.325 

References

Dickinson, D. & Coursey, R.D. (2002). Independence and overlap among neurocognitive correlates of community functioning in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research. 56(1-2): 161- 170. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0920-9964(01)00229-8

Norman, R.M.G., Malla, A.K., McLean, T., et al. (2000). The relationship of symptoms and level of functioning in schizophrenia to general wellbeing and the Quality of Life Scale. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 102(4):303-309. https://doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0447.2000.102004303.x

Parker, G., O’Donnell, M., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., & Proberts, M. (2002). Assessing outcome in community mental health patients: A comparative analysis of measures. International Journal of Social Psychiatry. 48(1):11-19. https://doi.org/10.1177/002076402128783046

Parker, G., Rosen, A., Emdur, N., & Hadzi-Pavlovic, D. (1991). The Life Skills Profile: Psychometric properties of a measure assessing function and disability in schizophrenia. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 83(2): 145-152 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0447.1991.tb07381.x

Simon, A.E., Giaocomini, V., Ferrero, F., & Mohr, S. (2003). Dysexecutive syndrome and social adjustment in schizophrenia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 37(3):340- 346. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1614.2003.01186.x

Trauer, T., Duckmanton, R.A., & Chiu, E. (1995). The Life Skills Profile: A study of its psychometric properties. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 29(3): 492-499. https://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.3109/00048679509064959

Trauer, T., Eagar, K., Gaines, P., & Bower, A. (2004). New Zealand Mental Health Consumers and their Outcomes. Auckland: Health Research Council of New Zealand. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/265246873_New_Zealand_Mental_Health_Consumers_and_Their_Outcomes 

Wooff, D., Schneider, J., Carpenter, J., & Brandon, T. (2003). Correlates of stress in carers. Journal of Mental Health. 12(1):29-40. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638230021000058274

Session Reactions Scale – 3 – Brief (SRS-3-B)

Dr David Hegarty

The Session Reactions Scale – 3 – Brief Version (SRS-3-B) is a 15-item self-report post-session measure for collecting systematic feedback on clients’ session reactions in the context of feedback-informed treatment (Řiháček et al., 2023).  It is suitable for clients engaged in psychological therapy who are 18 years and older, and is designed to be administered periodically to track the therapeutic relationship. 

 

Developer

Řiháček, T., Elliott, R., Owen, J., Ladmanová, M., Coleman, J. J., & Bugatti, M. (2023). Session Reactions Scale-3: Initial psychometric evidence. Psychotherapy Research: Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1080/10503307.2023.2241983 

References

Constantino, M. J., Coyne, A. E., & Muir, H. J. (2020). Evidence-based therapist responsivity to disruptive clinical process. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 27 (4), 405–416. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2020.01.003

Elliott, R., & James, E. (1989). Varieties of client experience in psychotherapy: An analysis of the literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 9 (4), 443–467. https://doi.org/10.1016/0272-7358(89)90003-2

Elliott, R., & Wexler, M. M. (1994). Measuring the impact of sessions in process-experiential therapy of depression: The session impacts scale. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 41 (2), 166–174. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0167.41.2.166

Farber, B. A. (2020). Disclosure, concealment, and dishonesty in psychotherapy: A clinically focused review. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 76 (2), 251–257. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22891

Mander, J., Schlarb, A., Teufel, M., Keller, F., Hautzinger, M.,Zipfel, S., Wittorf, A., & Sammet, I. (2015). The Individual Therapy Process Questionnaire: Development and validation of a revised measure to evaluate general change mechanisms in psychotherapy. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 22 (4), 328–345. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.1892

Reeker, J., Elliott, R., & Ensing, D. (1996).Measuring session effects in process-experiential and cognitive-behavioral therapies of PTSD: The Revised Session Reaction Scale. Paper Presented at Meetingo f the Society for Psychotherapy Research, Amelia Island, Florida. http://www.eft-scotland.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Reeker-Elliott-Ensing-1996.doc

Wu, M. B., & Levitt, H. M. (2020). A qualitative meta-analytic review of the therapist responsiveness literature: Guidelines for practice and training. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 50(3),  161-175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10879-020-09450-y

Personality Inventory for DSM-5 – Short Form (PID-5-SF)

Dr David Hegarty

The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 – short form (PID-5-SF) is a measure designed to assess dysfunctional personality traits according to the conceptual framework proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-5-TR). It is a concise version of the original PID-5 (Krueger et al., 2012) and consists of 100 items that measure five broad domains of personality dysfunction, which are then further divided into 25 facets, capturing specific aspects of personality functioning (Maples et al., 2015).

 

Developer

Maples, J. L., Carter, N. T., Few, L. R., Crego, C., Gore, W. L., Samuel, D. B., Williamson, R. L., Lynam, D. R., Widiger, T. A., Markon, K. E., Krueger, R. F., & Miller, J. D. (2015). Testing whether the DSM-5 personality disorder trait model can be measured with a reduced set of items: An item response theory investigation of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 . Psychological Assessment, 27(4), 1195–1210. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0000120

References

Bach, B., Markon, K., Simonsen, E., & Krueger, R. F. (2015). Clinical utility of the DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders: six cases from practice. Journal of psychiatric practice, 21(1), 3–25. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.pra.0000460618.02805.ef

Krueger, R. F., Derringer, J., Markon, K. E., Watson, D., & Skodol, A. E. (2012). Initial construction of a maladaptive personality trait model and inventory for DSM-5. Psychological medicine, 42(9), 1879–1890. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291711002674

Miller, J. D., Bagby, R. M., Hopwood, C. J., Simms, L. J., & Lynam, D. R. (2022). Normative data for PID-5 domains, facets, and personality disorder composites from a representative sample and comparison to community and clinical samples. Personality disorders, 13(5), 536–541. https://doi.org/10.1037/per0000548

Thimm, J. C., Jordan, S., & Bach, B. (2016). The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Short Form (PID-5-SF): psychometric properties and association with big five traits and pathological beliefs in a Norwegian population. BMC psychology, 4(1), 61. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-016-0169-5

International Personality Item Pool – NEO – 120 item version (IPIP-NEO-120)

Dr David Hegarty

The International Personality Item Pool – Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness – 120 item version (IPIP-NEO-120) is a 120-item self-report personality inventory for use by older adolescents and adults (ages 16+).

 

Developer

Johnson, J. A. (2014). Measuring thirty facets of the five factor model with a 120-item public domain inventory: Development of the IPIP-NEO-120. Journal of Research in Personality, 51, 78–89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2014.05.003

References

Briley, D. A., & Tucker-Drob, E. M. (2014). Genetic and environmental continuity in personality development: A metaanalysis. Psychological Bulletin, 140(5), 1303-1331. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0037091

Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R. (1995). Domains and facets: Hierarchical personality assessment using the revised NEO personality inventory. Journal of Personality Assessment, 64(1), 21-50. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327752jpa6401_2

Goldberg, L. R., Johnson, J. A., Eber, H. W., Hogan, R., Ashton, M. C., Cloninger, C. R., & Gough, H. G. (2006). The international personality item pool and the future of public-domain personality measures. Journal of Research in Personality, 40(1), 84-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2005.08.007

Hofstee, W. K., de Raad, B., & Goldberg, L. R. (1992). Integration of the Big Five and circumplex approaches to trait structure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63(1), 146–163. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.63.1.146

Johnson, J. A. (2020). Johnson’s IPIP-NEO data repository. Accessed at: https://osf.io/tbmh5/

Johnson, J. A. (n.d.). Descriptions used in IPIP-NEO Narrative Report. Accessed at: https://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/j/5/j5j/IPIPNEOdescriptions.html

Kajonius, P. J., & Carlander, A. (2017). Who gets ahead in life? Personality traits and childhood background in economic success. Journal of Economic Psychology, 59, 164-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joep.2017.03.004

Lenhard, W., & Lenhard, A. (2021). Improvement of Norm Score Quality via Regression-Based Continuous Norming. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 81(2), 229–261. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013164420928457

Markon, K. E., Krueger, R. F., & Watson, D. (2005). Delineating the structure of normal and abnormal personality: An integrative hierarchical approach. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88(1), 139-157. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.88.1.139

McCrae, R. R. (2010). The place of the FFM in personality psychology. Psychological Inquiry, 21(1), 57-64. https://doi.org/10.1080/10478401003648773

Paulhus, D. L. (2002). Socially desirable responding: The evolution of a construct. In H. I. Braun, D. N. Jackson, & D. E. Wiley (Eds.), The role of constructs in psychological and educational measurement (pp. 49–69). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

R Core Team (2022). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. https://www.R-project.org/ 

Roberts, B. W., Kuncel, N. R., Shiner, R., Caspi, A., & Goldberg, L. R. (2007). The power of personality: The comparative validity of personality traits, socioeconomic status, and cognitive ability for predicting important life outcomes. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2(4), 313-345. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6916.2007.00047.x

Skirbekk, V., & Blekesaune, M. (2014). Personality traits increasingly important for male fertility: Evidence from Norway. European Journal of Personality, 28(6), 521-529. https://doi.org/10.1002/per.1936

Strus, W., Cieciuch, J., & Rowiński, T. (2014). The circumplex of personality metatraits: A synthesizing model of personality based on the big five. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 18(4), 273-286. https://doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000017

Ziegler, M., & Bäckström, M. (2016). 50 facets of a trait—50 ways to mess up? European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 32(2), 105-110. https://doi.org/10.1027/1015-5759/a000372

Zillig, L. M. P., Hemenover, S. H., & Dienstbier, R. A. (2002). What do we assess when we assess a big 5 trait? A content analysis of the affective, behavioral, and cognitive processes represented in big 5 personality inventories. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28(6), 847-858. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167202289013

Acceptance and Action Questionnaire – version 2 (AAQ-2)

Dr David Hegarty

The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire – version 2 (AAQ-II), is the most widely used measure of psychological flexibility. It can be used weekly track how individuals are applying flexibility skills to their daily lives and is often used to measure progress in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

 

Developer

Bond, F. W., Hayes, S. C., Baer, R. A., Carpenter, K. M., Guenole, N., Orcutt, H. K., Waltz, T., & Zettle, R. D. (2011). Preliminary psychometric properties of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire – II: A revised measure of psychological inflexibility and experiential avoidance. Behavior Therapy, 42, 676–688. 

References

Berta-Otero, T., Barceló-Soler, A., Montero-Marin, J., Maloney, S., Pérez-Aranda, A., López-Montoyo, A., . . . Demarzo, M. (2023). Experiential avoidance in primary care providers: Psychometric properties of the Brazilian “Acceptance and action questionnaire” (AAQ-II) and its criterion validity on mood disorder-related psychological distress. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(1), 225. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010225

Bohlmeijer, E. T., Fledderus, M., Rokx, T. A. J. J., & Pieterse, M. E. (2011). Efficacy of an early intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy for adults with depressive symptomatology: Evaluation in a randomized controlled trial. Behaviour research and therapy, 49(1), 62-67.

Fledderus, M., Bohlmeijer, E. T., Smit, F., & Westerhof, G. J. (2010). Mental health promotion as a new goal in public mental health care: A randomized controlled trial of an intervention enhancing psychological flexibility. American journal of public health, 100(12), 2372-2372.

Forman, E. M., Herbert, J. D., Moitra, E., Yeomans, P. D., & Geller, P. A. (2007). A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy for anxiety and depression. Behavior modification, 31(6), 772-799.

Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., Wilson, K. G., Bissett, R. T., Pistorello, J., Toarmino, D., Polusny, M., A., Dykstra, T. A., Batten, S. V., Bergan, J., Stewart, S. H., Zvolensky, M. J., Eifert, G. H., Bond, F. W., Forsyth J. P., Karekla, M., & McCurry, S. M. (2004). Measuring experiential avoidance: A preliminary test of a working model. The Psychological Record, 54, 553-578.

Powers, M. B., Vörding, M. B. Z. V. S., & Emmelkamp, P. M. (2009). Acceptance and commitment therapy: A meta-analytic review. Psychotherapy and psychosomatics, 78(2), 73-80

Vowles, K. E., & McCracken, L. M. (2008). Acceptance and values-based action in chronic pain: a study of treatment effectiveness and process. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 76(3), 397.

Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation – 60-item Adolescent version (MID-60-A)

Dr David Hegarty

The Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation 60-item – Adolescent version (MID-60-A) is a screening tool for adolescents (16-19 years) that assesses dissociative symptoms and experiences specific to DSM-5-TR dissociative disorders. It also captures dissociative experiences, PTSD and somatic symptoms, and phenomena closely related to dissociation such as trance and self-confusion. The MID-60-A is the adolescent version of the MID-60 used in adults, with minor changes to two questions (50 and 52).

 

Developer

Kate, M.-A. (2022). The Adolescent Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation 60 item version (A-MID-60). [Unpublished measurement instrument]. Psychological Sciences, Southern Cross University.

References

Dell, P. F. (2006). The Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID): A Comprehensive measure of pathological dissociation. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 7(2), 77-106.

Dell, P. F., Coy, D. M., & Madere, J. (2017). An Interpretive Manual for the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). In (2nd ed.). https://www.mid-assessment.com/request-mid-analysis/

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., & Middleton, W. (2021). Childhood Sexual, Emotional, and Physical Abuse as Predictors of Dissociation in Adulthood. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/10538712.2021.1955789

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., & Middleton, W. (2022). Parent-child dynamics as predictors of dissociation in adulthood. [Manuscript submitted for publication]. Psychological Sciences, Southern Cross University.

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., Dorahy, M. J., & Middleton, W. (2021). Measuring Dissociative Symptoms and Experiences in an Australian College Sample Using a Short Version of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 22(3), 265-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2020.1792024

Kate, M.-A., Hopwood, T., & Jamieson, G. (2020). The prevalence of Dissociative Disorders and dissociative experiences in college populations: a meta-analysis of 98 studies. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 21(1), 16-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2019.1647915

Korzekwa, M. I., Dell, P. F., Links, P. S., Thabane, L., & Fougere, P. (2009). Dissociation in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Detailed Look. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 10(3), 346-367. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299730902956838

Laddis, A., & Dell, P. F. (2012). Dissociation and Psychosis in Dissociative Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 13(4), 397-413. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2012.664967

Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale – 16 item version (DERS-16)

Dr David Hegarty

The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale – 16 item version (DERS-16) is a self-report measure that assesses individuals’ typical levels of difficulties in emotion regulation. Based upon the original 36 item version DERS, the DERS-16 uses a clinically-useful conceptualization of emotion regulation that was developed to be applicable to a wide variety of psychological difficulties and relevant to clinical applications and treatment development (Gratz, 2007; Gratz & Tull, 2010).

Developer

Bjureberg, J., Ljótsson, B., Tull, M. T., Hedman, E., Sahlin, H., Lundh, L.-G., Bjärehed, J., DiLillo, D., Messman-Moore, T., Gumpert, C. H., & Gratz, K.L. (2016). Development and Validation of a Brief Version of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale: The DERS-16. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 1–13. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-015-9514-x

References

Cicchetti, D., Ackerman, B. P., & Izard, C. E. (1995). Emotions and emotion regulation in developmental psychopathology. Development and Psychopathology, 7(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400006301

Gratz K. L. (2007). Targeting emotion dysregulation in the treatment of self-injury. Journal of clinical psychology, 63(11), 1091–1103. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20417

Gratz, K.L., Roemer, L. Multidimensional Assessment of Emotion Regulation and Dysregulation: Development, Factor Structure, and Initial Validation of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment 26, 41–54 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JOBA.0000007455.08539.94

Gratz, K. L., & Tull, M. T. (2010). Emotion regulation as a mechanism of change in acceptance-and mindfulness-based treatments. In R. A. Baer (Ed.), Assessing mindfulness and acceptance: Illuminating the processes of change. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications

Gross, J. J., & Jazaieri, H. (2014). Emotion, Emotion Regulation, and Psychopathology: An Affective Science Perspective. Clinical Psychological Science, 2(4), 387–401. https://doi.org/10.1177/2167702614536164

Izard, CE.; Ackerman, BP. (2000). Motivational, organizational, and regulatory functions of discrete emotions. In Lewis, M.; Haviland-Jones, JM. (Ed). Handbook of emotions. 2nd. New York: Guilford Press. p. 253-264.

Sheppes, G., Suri, G., & Gross, J. J. (2015). Emotion regulation and psychopathology. Annual review of clinical psychology, 11, 379–405. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032814-112739

Thompson R. A. (1994). Emotion regulation: a theme in search of definition. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 59(2-3), 25–52.

Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI)

Dr David Hegarty

The Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI) contains 18 items that assess health anxiety independent of physical health status.

Items assess worry about one’s health, awareness of bodily sensations and/or changes, and the feared consequences of having an illness (Salkovskis et al., 2002). It can be used in both healthy individuals and physically ill individuals including those who were temporarily sick or diagnosed with a serious and/or chronic illness.

Developer

Salkovskis, P. M., Rimes, K. A., Warwick, H. M. C., & Clark, D. M. (2002). The Health Anxiety Inventory: development and validation of scales for the measurement of health anxiety and hypochondriasis. Psychological Medicine, 32(05), 843-853.

References

Haig-Ferguson, A., Cooper, K., Cartwright, E., Loades, M. E., & Daniels, J. (2021). Practitioner review: Health anxiety in children and young people in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Behavioural and cognitive psychotherapy, 49(2), 129-143.

Hedman, E., Andersson, G., Andersson, E., Ljotsson, B., Rück, C., Asmundson, G. J., & Lindefors, N. (2011). Internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy for severe health anxiety: randomised controlled trial. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 198(3), 230-236.

Lebel, S., Mutsaers, B., Tomei, C., Leclair, C.S., Jones, G., Petricone-Westwood, D., Rutkowski, N., Ta, V., Trudel, G., Laflamme, S.Z. and Lavigne, A.A. (2020). Health anxiety and illness-related fears across diverse chronic illnesses: A systematic review on conceptualization, measurement, prevalence, course, and correlates. Plos one, 15(7), e0234124.

Olatunji, B. O., Etzel, E. N., Tomarken, A. J., Ciesielski, B. G., & Deacon, B. (2011). The effects of safety behaviors on health anxiety: An experimental investigation. Behaviour research and therapy, 49(11), 719-728.

Taylor, S., Asmundson, G. J., & Hyprochondria. (2004). Treating health anxiety: A cognitive-behavioral approach (Vol. 494, p. 495). New York: Guilford Press.

Williams, M. J., McManus, F., Muse, K., & Williams, J. M. G. (2011). Mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy for severe health anxiety (hypochondriasis): An interpretative phenomenological analysis of patients’ experiences. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 50(4), 379-397.

Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS)

Dr David Hegarty

The Regensburg Insomnia Rating Scale (RIS) is a 10-item rating scale to assess the cognitive, behavioural, and emotional aspects of psychophysiological insomnia (PI; Crönlein et al., 2013). The scale has been validated in an adult population.

Developer

Crönlein, T., Langguth, B., Popp, R., Lukesch, H., Pieh, C., Hajak, G., & Geisler, P. (2013). Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS): a new short rating scale for the assessment of psychological symptoms and sleep in insomnia; study design: development and validation of a new short self-rating scale in a sample of 218 patients suffering from insomnia and 94 healthy controls. Health and quality of life outcomes, 11(1), 1-8.

References

Crönlein, T., Langguth, B., Popp, R., Lukesch, H., Pieh, C., Hajak, G., & Geisler, P. (2013). Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS): a new short rating scale for the assessment of psychological symptoms and sleep in insomnia; study design: development and validation of a new short self-rating scale in a sample of 218 patients suffering from insomnia and 94 healthy controls. Health and quality of life outcomes, 11(1), 1-8.

Perlis, M., & Gehrman, P. (2013). Psychophysiological insomnia. the behavioural model and a neurocognitive perspective, 1997, 6.

Morin CM. Insomnia: Psychological assessment and management: Guilford press; 1993.

Clinical Impairment Assessment Questionnaire (CIA)

Dr David Hegarty

The Clinical Impairment Assessment questionnaire (CIA) is a 16-item self-report measure of the severity of psychosocial impairment due to eating disorder features (Bohn and Fairburn, 2008). It focuses on the past 28 days. It was developed as a measure of functional impairment in domains of life that are typically affected by an eating disorder which includes mood and perception of self, cognitive functioning, interpersonal functioning, and work performance. It has been normed in adults 17-65 years of age. The CIA is intended to assist in the clinical assessment of patients both before and after treatment for eating disorders (Bohn et al, 2008).

Developer

Bohn, K., Doll, H. A., Cooper, Z., O’Connor, M., Palmer, R. L., & Fairburn, C. G. (2008). The measurement of impairment due to eating disorder psychopathology. Behaviour research and therapy, 46(10), 1105-1110.

Bohn K, & Fairburn CG. (2008). Clinical Impairment Assessment Questionnaire (CIA 3.0). In Fairburn CG. Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Eating Disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

References

Bohn, K., Doll, H. A., Cooper, Z., O’Connor, M., Palmer, R. L., & Fairburn, C. G. (2008). The measurement of impairment due to eating disorder psychopathology. Behaviour research and therapy, 46(10), 1105-1110.

Fairburn CG, & Beglin SJ. (2008). Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (6.0). In Fairburn CG. Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Eating Disorders. New York: Guilford Press. 

Jenkins, P. E. (2013). Psychometric validation of the Clinical Impairment Assessment in a UK eating disorder service. Eating behaviors, 14(2), 241-243.

Depression Anxiety Stress Scales – Youth Version (DASS-Y)

Dr David Hegarty

The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales – Youth version (DASS-Y) is a version of the DASS-21 for youth aged 7 – 18 years of age designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress .

 Developer

Szabo, M., & Lovibond, P. F. (2022). Development and Psychometric Properties of the DASS-Youth (DASS-Y): An Extension of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) to Adolescents and Children. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, 766890. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.766890

Wender Utah Rating Scale – 25 item version (WURS-25)

Dr David Hegarty

The Wender Utah Rating Scale – 25 item version (WURS-25) is a self-report instrument that is designed to retrospectively evaluate the presence and severity of childhood symptoms of ADHD in adults (18+; Ward et al., 1993).

Developer

Ward, M. F., Wender, P. H., & Reimherr, F. W. (1993). The Wender Utah Rating Scale: an aid in the retrospective diagnosis of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 150(6), 885–890. https://doi.org/10.1176/ajp.150.6.885 

Reference

Brevik, E. J., Lundervold, A. J., Haavik, J., & Posserud, M.-B. (2020). Validity and accuracy of the Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale (ASRS) and the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) symptom checklists in discriminating between adults with and without ADHD. Brain and Behavior, 10(6), e01605. https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1605

Caci, H. M., Bouchez, J., & Baylé, F. J. (2010). An aid for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder at adulthood: Psychometric properties of the French versions of two Wender Utah Rating Scales (WURS-25 and WURS-K). Comprehensive Psychiatry, 51, 325–331.

Faraone, S. V., Asherson, P., Banaschewski, T., Biederman, J., Buitelaar, J. K., Ramos-Quiroga, J. A., … Franke, B. (2015). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 1, 15020.

Kouros, I., Horberg, N., Ekselius, L., & Ramklint, M. (2018). Wender Utah Rating Scale-25 (WURS-25): Psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the Swedish translation. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 123, 230–236.

McCann, B. S., Scheele, L., Ward, N., & Roy-Byrne, P. (2000). Discriminant validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale for attention-deficit/hyper-activity disorder in adults. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 12(2), 240–24

Stanton, K., & Watson, D. (2016). An examination of the structure and construct validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 98(5), 545–552.

Mackin, R. S., & Horner, M. D. (2005). Relationship of the Wender Utah Rating Scale to objective measures of attention. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 46(6), 468–471. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2005.03.004 

Personal Wellbeing Index – Adult – 5 (PWI-A)

Dr David Hegarty

The Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI 5th edition; International Wellbeing Group, 2013) is a 9-item self-report questionnaire that asks people to rate how satisfied they are with different domains of their lives.

Developer

International Wellbeing Group (2013). Personal Wellbeing Index: 5th Edition. Melbourne: Australian Centre on Quality of Life, Deakin University http://www.acqol.com.au/instruments#measures

Reference

Khor, S., Cummins, R.A., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M., Capic, T., Jona, C., Olsson, C.A., & Hutchinson, D. (2020). Australian Unity Wellbeing Index: – Report 36: Social connectedness and wellbeing. Geelong: Australian Centre on Quality of Life, School of Psychology, Deakin University. http://www.acqol.com.au/projects#reports

Tomyn, A. J., Weinberg, M. K., & Cummins, R. A. (2015). Intervention efficacy among ‘at risk’adolescents: a test of subjective wellbeing homeostasis theory. Social Indicators Research, 120(3), 883-895.

Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 (PSC-17)

Dr David Hegarty

The Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 (PSC-17) is a psychosocial screening tool designed to facilitate the recognition of cognitive, emotional, and behavioural problems so that appropriate interventions can be initiated as early as possible.

Developer

Gardner, W., Murphy, M., Childs, G., Kelleher, K., & Sturner, R. (1999). The PSC-17: a brief Pediatric Symptom Checklist with psychosocial problem subscales. A report from PROS and ASPN. Ambulatory Child Health, 5(3), 225–236.

Reference

Murphy, J. M., Bergmann, P., Chiang, C., Sturner, R., Howard, B., Abel, M. R., & Jellinek, M. (2016). The PSC-17: Subscale Scores, Reliability, and Factor Structure in a New National Sample. Pediatrics, 138(3). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-0038

Stoppelbein, L., Greening, L., Moll, G., Jordan, S., & Suozzi, A. (2012). Factor analyses of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 with African-American and Caucasian pediatric populations. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 37(3), 348–357. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsr103

Composite Caregiving Questionnaire (CCQ)

Dr David Hegarty

The Caregiving Composite Questionnaire (CCQ) is a 42-item questionnaire completed by parents/caregivers of children aged 0 to 6 years. It measures five parenting constructs that are important in reducing attachment insecurity and promoting attachment security in young children: 

  1. Parenting self-efficacy in empathy
  2. Parenting self-efficacy in expressing affection and managing child emotion
  3. Caregiving helplessness
  4. Hostile perceptions of the child
  5. Parent mentalisation

Reference

Byron B. & Hawkins E. (2022). [unpublished data].

Diamond, C. S., Caltabiano, N. J., Caltabiano, M., & Goodman, D. (2013). Maternal reflective function scale: the development of a scale for primary health care services. Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 16, 14-14.   

Giallo, R., Cooklin, A., Wade, C., D’Esposito, F., & Nicholson, J. M. (2013). Maternal postnatal mental health and later emotional-behavioural development of children: The mediating role of parenting behaviour. Child: Care, Health and Development, 40(3), 327-336. https://doi.org/10.1111/cch.12028

George, C., & Solomon, J. (2011). Caregiving helplessness: The development of a screening measure for disorganized maternal caregiving. In J. Solomon & C. George (Eds.), Disorganized attachment and caregiving (pp. 133-166). New York: Guilford Press.

Huth-Bocks, A. C., Guyon-Harris, K., Calvert, M., Scott, S., & Ahlfs-Dunn, S. (2016). The caregiving helplessness questionnaire: Evidence for validity and utility with mothers of infants. Infant Mental Health Journal, 37(3), 208-221. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21559

Kendall, S., & Bloomfield, L. (2005). Developing and validating a tool to measure parenting self-efficacy. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 51(2), 174-181. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2005.03479.x

Maxwell, AM., McMahon, C., Huber, A. et al. Examining the Effectiveness of Circle of Security Parenting (COS-P): A Multi-Site Non-Randomized Study with Waitlist Control. J Child Fam Stud 30, 1123–1140 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-021-01932-4

Wittkowski, A., Garrett, C., Calam, R., & Weisberg, D. (2017). Self-report measures of parental self-efficacy: A systematic review of the current literature. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(11), 2960-2978. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-017-0830-5

Obsessional Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R)

Dr David Hegarty

The Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R) (Foa et al., 2002) is an 18-item self-report questionnaire and measures OCD symptoms across 6 subscales including washing, checking, neutralising, obsessing, ordering and hoarding. The scale is suitable for use with adults and adolescents (16 years +; Piqueras et al., 2009).

Developer

Foa, E. B., Huppert, J. D., Leiberg, S., Langner, R., Kichic, R., Hajcak, G., & Salkovskis, P. M. (2002). The Obsessive-Complusive Inventory: Development and validation of a short version. Psychological Assessment, 14(4), 485–495. https://doi.org/10.1037//1040-3590.14.4.485

Reference

Abramovitch, A., Abramowitz, J. S., Riemann, B. C., & McKay, D. (2020). Severity benchmarks and contemporary clinical norms for the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 27, 100557. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2020.100557

Chasson, G. S., Tang, S., Gray, B., Sun, H., & Wang, J. (2013). Further validation of a Chinese version of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised. Behavioural and cognitive psychotherapy, 41(2), 249–254. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1352465812000379

Gönner, S., Leonhart, R., & Ecker, W. (2008). The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R): validation of the German version in a sample of patients with OCD, anxiety disorders, and depressive disorders. Journal of anxiety disorders, 22(4), 734–749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2007.07.007

Huppert, J. D., Walther, M. R., Hajcak, G., Yadin, E., Foa, E. B., Simpson, H. B., & Liebowitz, M. R. (2007). The OCI-R: validation of the subscales in a clinical sample. Journal of anxiety disorders, 21(3), 394–406. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2006.05.006

Rodríguez, J. A. P., González, A. E. M., Montesinos, M. D. H., Rivas, M. Á. F., Mataix-Cols, D., & Alcázar, A. I. R. (2009). Psychometric properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised in a non-clinical sample of late adolescents. Behavioral Psychology, 17(3), 561–572. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/229433233

Solem, S., Hjemdal, O., Vogel, P. A., & Stiles, T. C. (2010). A Norwegian version of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised: psychometric properties. Scandinavian journal of psychology, 51(6), 509–516. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2009.00798.x

Wootton, B. M., Diefenbach, G. J., Bragdon, L. B., Steketee, G., Frost, R. O., & Tolin, D. F. (2015). A contemporary psychometric evaluation of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Psychological Assessment, 27(3), 874–882. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0000075 

International Trauma Questionnaire – Child and Adolescent Version (ITQ-CA)

Dr David Hegarty

The International Trauma Questionnaire – Children and Adolescent Version (ITQ-CA) is a 22 item self-report measure focusing on the core features of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD) in children and adolescents (7 – 17 years old).

 

Developer

Cloitre, M., Shevlin, M., Brewin, C. R., Bisson, J. I., Roberts, N. P., Maercker, A., … Hyland, P. (2018). The International Trauma Questionnaire: Development of a self-report measure of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 138(6), 536–546.

References

Haselgruber, A., Sölva, K., & Lueger-Schuster, B. (2020a). Validation of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD in foster children using the International Trauma Questionnaire. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 141(1), 60–73. https://doi.org/10.1111/acps.13100

Haselgruber, A., Sölva, K., & Lueger-Schuster, B. (2020b). Symptom structure of ICD-11 Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) in trauma-exposed foster children: examining the International Trauma Questionnaire – Child and Adolescent Version (ITQ-CA). European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 11(1), 1818974. https://doi.org/10.1080/20008198.2020.1818974 

Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation – 60-item version (MID-60)

Dr David Hegarty

The Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation 60-item version (MID-60) is a screening tool for adults (18 years +) that assesses dissociative symptoms and experiences specific to DSM-5-TR dissociative disorders. It also captures dissociative experiences, PTSD and somatic symptoms, and phenomena closely related to dissociation such as trance and self-confusion. There is also an adolescent version for use with adolescents ages 16 to 19 years of age – the MID-60-A.

Developer

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., Dorahy, M. J., & Middleton, W. (2021). Measuring Dissociative Symptoms and Experiences in an Australian College Sample Using a Short Version of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 22(3), 265-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2020.1792024

References

Dell, P. F. (2006). The Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID): A Comprehensive measure of pathological dissociation. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 7(2), 77-106.

Dell, P. F., Coy, D. M., & Madere, J. (2017). An Interpretive Manual for the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). In (2nd ed.). https://www.mid-assessment.com/request-mid-analysis/

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., & Middleton, W. (2021). Childhood Sexual, Emotional, and Physical Abuse as Predictors of Dissociation in Adulthood. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/10538712.2021.1955789

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., & Middleton, W. (2022). Parent-child dynamics as predictors of dissociation in adulthood. [Manuscript submitted for publication]. Psychological Sciences, Southern Cross University.

Kate, M.-A., Jamieson, G., Dorahy, M. J., & Middleton, W. (2021). Measuring Dissociative Symptoms and Experiences in an Australian College Sample Using a Short Version of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 22(3), 265-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2020.1792024

Kate, M.-A., Hopwood, T., & Jamieson, G. (2020). The prevalence of Dissociative Disorders and dissociative experiences in college populations: a meta-analysis of 98 studies. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 21(1), 16-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2019.1647915

Korzekwa, M. I., Dell, P. F., Links, P. S., Thabane, L., & Fougere, P. (2009). Dissociation in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Detailed Look. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 10(3), 346-367. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299730902956838

Laddis, A., & Dell, P. F. (2012). Dissociation and Psychosis in Dissociative Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 13(4), 397-413. https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2012.664967

McLean Screening Instrument for BPD (MSI-BPD)

Dr David Hegarty

The MSI-BPD is a 10-item self-report instrument used to screen for borderline personality disorder (BPD; Zanarini et al., 2003) in youth (15 years of age or greater; Chanen et al., 2008; Noblin et al., 2013; van Alebeek et al., 2017) or adults.

 

Developer

Zanarini, M. C., Vujanovic, A. A., Parachini, E. A., Boulanger, J. L., Frankenburg, F. R., & Hennen, J. (2003). A screening measure for BPD: the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD). Journal of Personality Disorders, 17(6), 568–573. https://doi.org/10.1521/pedi.17.6.568.25355

References

Boylan, K., Chahal, J., Courtney, D. B., Sharp, C., & Bennett, K. (2019). An evaluation of clinical practice guidelines for self-harm in adolescents: The role of borderline personality pathology. Personality Disorders, 10(6), 500–510. https://doi.org/10.1037/per0000349

Chanen, A. M., Jovev, M. J., Djaja, D., McDougall, E., Yuen, H. P., Rawlings, D., & Jackson, H. J. (2008). Screening for borderline personality disorder in outpatient youth. Journal of Personality Disorders, 22(4), 353–364. https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/pedi.2008.22.4.353 

Gardner, K., & Qualter, P. (2009). Reliability and validity of three screening measures of borderline personality disorder in a nonclinical population. Personality and Individual Differences, 46, 636-641. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2009.01.005

Klonsky, E. D., & Glenn, C. R. (2009). Assessing the functions of non-suicidal self-injury: Psychometric properties of the Inventory of Statements About Self-injury (ISAS). Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31(3), 215–219. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-008-9107-z

Magnavita, J. J., Critchfield, K. L., Levy, K. N., & Lebow, J. L. (2010). Ethical considerations in treatment of personality dysfunction: Using evidence, principles, and clinical judgement. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 41, 64–74.

Noblin, J. L., Venta, A., & Sharp, C. (2014). The validity of the MSI-BPD among inpatient adolescents. Assessment, 21(2), 210–217. https://doi.org/10.1177/1073191112473177

van Alebeek, A., van der Heijden, P. T., Hessels, C., Thong, M.S.Y., & van Aken, M. (2017). Comparison of three questionnaires to screen for borderline personality disorder in adoles- cents and young adults. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 33, 123–128.

Zimmerman, M., & Balling, C. (2021). Screening for Borderline Personality Disorder with the McLean Screening Instrument: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Journal of Personality Disorders, 35(2), 288–298. https://doi.org/10.1521/pedi_2019_33_451

Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Teacher Rating Scale (VADTRS)

Dr David Hegarty

The Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Teacher Rating Scale (VADTRS) is used to help in the diagnostic process of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children between the ages of 6 and 12. It is the teacher rated version which can be used in parallel with the parent version: Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Parent Rating Scale (VADPRS).

 

Developer

Wolraich, M. L., Bard, D. E., Neas, B., Doffing, M., & Beck, L. (2013). The psychometric properties of the Vanderbilt attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnostic teacher rating scale in a community population. Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP, 34(2), 83–93. https://doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e31827d55c3  

 

Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS)

Dr David Hegarty

The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS; Watson et al., 1988) is a 20-item self- report measure to assess positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA). PA is associated with pleasurable engagement with the environment, whereas NA reflects a dimension of general distress summarising a variety of negative states such as anger, guilt, or anxiety.

 

 

Developer

Watson, D., Clark, L. A., & Tellegen, A. (1988). Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: The PANAS scales. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6), 1063–1070. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.54.6.1063

References

Crawford, J. R., & Henry, J. D. (2004). The positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS): construct validity, measurement properties and normative data in a large non-clinical sample. The British Journal of Clinical Psychology / the British Psychological Society, 43(Pt 3), 245–265. https://doi.org/10.1348/0144665031752934

Heubeck, B. G., & Wilkinson, R. (2019). Is all fit that glitters gold? Comparisons of two, three and bi-factor models for Watson, Clark & Tellegen’s 20-item state and trait PANAS. Personality and Individual Differences, 144, 132–140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2019.03.002

Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI)

Dr David Hegarty

The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI; Newman et al., 1996) is a 25-item self-report measure to determine perceived tinnitus handicap severity. The THI is a useful measure for determining the efficacy of psychological treatment for tinnitus (Zeman et al., 2011).

Developer

Newman, C. W., Jacobson, G. P., & Spitzer, J. B. (1996). Development of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. Archives of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, 122(2), 143–148. https://doi.org/10.1001/archotol.1996.01890140029007

References

McCombe, A., Baguley, D., Coles, R., McKenna, L., McKinney, C., Windle-Taylor, P., & British Association of Otolaryngologists, Head and Neck Surgeons. (2001). Guidelines for the grading of tinnitus severity: the results of a working group commissioned by the British Association of Otolaryngologists, Head and Neck Surgeons, 1999. Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences, 26(5), 388–393. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2273.2001.00490.x

Gos, E., Sagan, A., Skarzynski, P. H., & Skarzynski, H. (2020). Improved measurement of tinnitus severity: Study of the dimensionality and reliability of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. PloS One, 15(8), e0237778. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0237778

Zeman, F., Koller, M., Figueiredo, R., Aazevedo, A., Rates, M., Coelho, C., Kleinjung, T., de Ridder, D., Langguth, B., & Landgrebe, M. (2011). Tinnitus handicap inventory for evaluating treatment effects: which changes are clinically relevant? Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 145(2), 282–287. https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599811403882

Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness – Youth Version (MAIA-Y)

Dr David Hegarty

The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness – Youth Version (MAIA-Y) is an 8-scale state-trait questionnaire with 32 items to measure multiple dimensions of interoception (body awareness). The MAIA-Y is suitable for use with youths between 7 – 17 years of age. There is a parallel adult version (MAIA-2) for use with individuals 18+ years of age.

Developer

Jones, A., Silas, J., Todd, J., Stewart, A., Acree, M., Coulson, M., & Mehling, W. E. (2021). Exploring the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness in youth aged 7-17 years. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 77(3), 661–682. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.23067

References

Eggart, M., Todd, J., & Valdés-Stauber, J. (2021). Validation of the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA-2) questionnaire in hospitalized patients with major depressive disorder. PloS One, 16(6), e0253913. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0253913

Mehling, W. E., Price, C., Daubenmier, J. J., Acree, M., Bartmess, E., & Stewart, A. (2012). The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). PloS One, 7(11), e48230. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048230

Price, C. J., & Hooven, C. (2018). Interoceptive Awareness Skills for Emotion Regulation: Theory and Approach of Mindful Awareness in Body-Oriented Therapy (MABT). Frontiers in psychology, 9, 798. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00798

Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness – Version 2 (MAIA-2)

Dr David Hegarty

The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness – Version 2 (MAIA-2) is an 8-subscale state-trait self-report questionnaire to measure multiple dimensions of interoception (awareness of bodily sensations). The MAIA-2 is suitable for adults (18+) and has 37 items. There is a parallel youth version (MAIA-Y) for use with individuals 7 – 17 years of age.

 

Developer

Mehling WE, Acree M, Stewart A, Silas J, Jones A (2018) The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness, Version 2 (MAIA-2). PLoS ONE 13(12): e0208034. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0208034

References

Eggart, M., Todd, J., & Valdés-Stauber, J. (2021). Validation of the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA-2) questionnaire in hospitalized patients with major depressive disorder. PloS One, 16(6), e0253913. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0253913

Mehling, W. E., Price, C., Daubenmier, J. J., Acree, M., Bartmess, E., & Stewart, A. (2012). The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA). PloS One, 7(11), e48230. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048230

Price, C. J., & Hooven, C. (2018). Interoceptive Awareness Skills for Emotion Regulation: Theory and Approach of Mindful Awareness in Body-Oriented Therapy (MABT). Frontiers in psychology, 9, 798. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00798

Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale – Revised (RAADS-R)

Dr David Hegarty

The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale – Revised (RAADS–R) is an 80-item clinician-administered questionnaire designed to identify adults with Autism. The assessment is suitable for adult (age 18+) males and females with average or above-average intelligence (i.e. IQ above 80).

Developer

Ritvo, R. A., Ritvo, E. R., Guthrie, D., Ritvo, M. J., Hufnagel, D. H., McMahon, W., Tonge, B., Mataix-Cols, D., Jassi, A., Attwood, T., & Eloff, J. (2011). The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R): a scale to assist the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in adults: an international validation study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(8), 1076–1089. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-010-1133-5  

References

Ritvo, R., Ritvo, E., Guthrie, D., Yuwiler, A., Ritvo, M., & Weisbender, L. (2008). A scale to assist the diagnosis of Autism and Asperger’s disorder in Adults (RAADS): A pilot study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38(2), 213–223.

Borderline Symptom List (BSL-23)

Dr David Hegarty

The Borderline Symptom List – Short Version (BSL-23) is a 23-item self-rating instrument for specific assessment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptomatology in adults (18+). The scale assesses DSM BPD diagnostic criteria (e.g., affective instability, recurrent suicidal behaviour, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behaviour, and transient dissociative symptoms) in addition to items that are based on borderline-typical empirical findings regarding self-criticism, problems with trust, emotional vulnerability, and proneness to shame, self-disgust, loneliness, and helplessness (Kleindienst et al., 2020).